Saturday, September 18, 2010

Fear and Faith

Fear and faith cannot both exist in the mind at the same time.

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Balance Life & You: Cycling

GETTING STARTED: THE BIKE

Part of having balance in your life is to have some type of excersise program. Cycling can be one of the most rewarding and fun sports to be a part of while getting a great workout.


Just about any bicycle will work for commuting. I've traveled to work on a mountain bike, a road bike, a hybrid, and even a fat-tired cruiser. The important thing is to get a bike you feel comfortable on. Find a reputable bike shop, consult with the sales staff, think about how you might use the bike, how far you'll be going, what you might need to carry, what conditions you'll be riding in, and so on. My present commuting bike is a hybrid, which I'd recommend for most everyday urban riding needs.

In much of the world -- in such countries as Japan, Denmark, France or Holland -- the bicycle is valued as a utilitarian vehicle. And bikes sold in those countries come equipped with fenders, bells, lights, kickstands, racks, and, very important, chainguards.

In the US the bicycle is generally considered a toy, a recreational device, or as exercise equipment. Something you load on top of your car, like skis or a surfboard, and travel to some remote area to "play." That's why bike shops are filled with mountain bikes. They thrive on selling the "sport" of cycling. Travel they leave to other vehicle retailers, i.e. auto dealerships. This is a big mistake.

Don't buy a mountain bike just because the sales person has lots of them to sell. Mountain bikes are fine for many things, even commuting. However, most people never get near a trail with their mountain bike. Those fat knobby tires may really dig into the dirt on a stretch of fire road. But they add lots of rolling resistance on pavement. (They might suggest that the knobby tires are more "flat resistant." Don't believe it. I can tell you from experience that large glass fragments, nails and pushpins can puncture mountain bike tires too. As you'll see later, flats are really no big deal.)

If you think most of your riding will be done on asphalt streets, then consider a hybrid, touring, or a road bike. They're generally made with larger, easier rolling wheels, with street "slicks" or other tire made for riding on pavement, and offer a longer wheelbase for a more comfortable ride. The bike pictured here, inspired by European commuting bikes, is set up well for everyday travel.

If you're considering buying a new bike to begin commuting, here are my suggestions for factors to consider; here are my bicycles, complete with reasons and rationalizations. Minnesota cyclist John Faughnan has a great article on the advantages of using touring bikes for everyday commuting. Many cyclists also happily enjoy commuting on recumbent and fixed-gear bikes; I don't usually recommend either for new cyclists. But for many people, the comfort and ease of a recumbent or the simplicity of a fixed-gear would be appropriate. For multimodal bike commuting (combining transit and bicycling), a folding bike might be a good option.

In short, my point is: get the bike that suits you. There's no need to have the latest, the most exciting, the most colorful, the most expensive bike.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Slow down and enjoy the view

Monday, April 26, 2010

Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You
Balance Life and You

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Spirituality

Do You Wake Up Every Morning Feeling 100% Fulfilled?
Let’s not skirt the issue here. Do you wake up every morning knowing – with every fiber of your soul – that you’re enjoying the most creative and spiritual life you can make for yourself?

Do you love your work?
Do you spend enough time with the family?
Are you earning enough?
Are you putting your creativity potential to full use?
Are you as healthy as you should be?
Are you living a spiritual enlightened life?
Are you truly happy?